What is CCSVI?

Here Arizona Doppler Specialists demonstrates a CCSVI Doppler ultrasound screening that shows an abnormal vein with obstructions that clearly indicate narrowing and reverse blood flow. The blue represents blood leaving the brain and the red represents blood that is being backed up and forced back into the brain. This toxic deoxygenated blood contains heavy metals like iron and other harmful components. Narrow veins that reduce blood flow and return “bad” blood back to the brain are thought to cause some symptoms of multiple sclerosis in a condition called Chronic Cerebrospinal Venous Insufficiency (CCSVI). The theory was first posited by Italian doctor and vascular surgeon Paolo Zamboni, MD, who found in a preliminary study that over 90% of the participants afflicted with multiple sclerosis had several problems in the veins draining blood from the brain, like stenosis or defective valves. He noticed a high level of accumulation of iron deposits in the brain due to the restricted blood flow. According to Dr. Zamboni some symptoms of multiple sclerosis, seen in his own wife as well as 73% of his patients, were abated after an endovascular procedure to open these veins. The theory is controversial, but the Multiple Sclerosis Society of Canada accepted Zamboni’s treatment as promising. A University of Buffalo research team is also developing a program to test Zamboni’s theory and several other international studies are currently underway.